Funder For Animal Welfare Charities

The Jean Sainsbury Animal Welfare Trust

There is usually a wonderful human interest story behind each trust and this one is no exception.  Jean Sainsbury led a wonderful life, filled, as many peoples lives are, with moments of tragedy and fulfillment.

When Jean's estranged Father died leaving her millions, she decided she would use the money for the good of others, especially the welfare of animals.

The Trust meet three times a year to discuss applications - March, July and November and consider requests from £1000 to £10,000.  They do sometimes also consider smaller applications outside of these dates but these are at the discretion of the Chairman and Administrator.  The deadline for applications received is: 1st February (for March meeting) 1st June (for July meeting) and 1st October (for November meeting).

Someone from the Trust will visit you if you are successful in your application, which I really like the idea of as it links your work with the people paying for it and it also means that any future applications have  deeper connection with the charity.  Another great thing about this organisation is that they are happy to receive repeat applications which so many other charities do not.

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Professional Fundraisers…who needs ’em?

There was an interesting article in this week's Third Sector magazine (6 July).  I shouldn't have received it at all... I cancelled my subscription sometime ago in an effort to be green...I read their news articles online usually, so was somewhat surprised (and shamefully delighted - please don't hold it against me!) to receive the magazine through the letter box.

In this article called The Future of Fundraising, Richard Gutch asks the question: "When do you stop being a government contractor and start being a charity?"

It's a good question isnt it!

Richard makes the point that many of our biggest charities in the UK, receive significant amounts of government funding and it is they that are facing extremely hard times as the cuts are made to public expenditure.

Back in May, Richard had interviewed CEO's in 9 charities asking them the same question.  He found that many of them had not had to do much fundraising at all, so awash were they in government money. In some cases income from fundraising was a little as 10% of overall funds.

"one described their charity as like a branch of the NHS..."

About 40,000 charities are today relying...RELYING...on government contracts to run their charities and deliver essential services to some of the most vulnerable people in the country.  That's 25% of our entire voluntary sector, with some of the largest charities in that 25%.  What this may mean we can only have nightmares about.
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Building Schools for the Future

In the news today was a story with a headline that read:  "Could cuts halt school buildings transformation?"  This story is highlighting the intended cuts to the Building Schools for the Future (BSF) initiative, which is to transform many schools from temporary accommodation to state of the art facilities, such as Liverpool's Alsop High as stated in the article.

So it made me think, what the outcome of the cuts would be?  There are 1100 schools signed up for BSF in the UK which begs the question are they really unfit for purpose?  I suspect they are.

Teaching goes on in buildings long past their 'sell by date' which must impact on the quality of the learning experience for the attending pupils.  What hope are we giving to these youngsters for their futures?

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Creating a compelling ‘case for support’ is the key to successful fundraising for the whole of your organisation.  If at any point anyone involved with you is unclear about what you do and why you do it, it will reflect badly on the organisation as a whole.  In marketing terms the saying goes: ‘a confused buyer never buys’ and so it is when also looking at potential funders.  A funder who is confused about what and why you do what you do will rarely bother to dig deeper to find out and simply move on to the next charity who has clear goals and a compelling case for support.

There is a fundraising cycle and the very beginning of that cycle is the ‘Case Statement’  - the reason your organisation is needing funds.

You will need to answer these 7 questions:

  1. Who are you as an organisation
  2. Why do you exist
  3. What is distinctive/different about you
  4. What do you want to accomplish
  5. How do you plan to go about it
  6. What makes you competent to do it
  7. How will you be accountable for what you do

By answering these questions you will get a clear understanding of why you are asking for funding – and so will all potential funders!

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8 Ways To Fundraise

8 Ways To Fundraise

Last time we talked about getting ready to Fundraise for your organisation.  I hope that it has prompted you to collate all the information you need and you are now ready to fundraise.

This post is about the many different ways organisations can raise funds because most need to use a range of activities to accomplish their aims and it’s here that we turn our attention to 8 Ways To Fundraise.

Trusts

There are currently just short of 160,000 charities in the UK (and another 20,000 subsidiaries) and a good proportion of those GIVE money away to other charities that are doing the kind of work they want to fund.  This is where your Case for Support is so important.  When you are writing a letter to a trust, your Case for Support will help you enormously.  With just a bit of tweaking the document will provide you with baseline information making each letter/application very straightforward.

High Net-Worth Individuals

Seeking out people who are very wealthy (High-Net Worth) with similar aims to that of your organisation, building relationships, and then asking for donations.

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