Introduction To Fundraising Part Three

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Today's post is all about The Case For Support - probably the most important piece of work you can do in your fundraising efforts.  This video is only 5 minutes long and is once again a very brief overview.  Tomorrow is the last part of the series and is all about Fundraising Strategies.

Introduction To Fundraising Part Two

 
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Today's video is part two of the four part series - The 8 Main Ways To Raise Funds.  It is only 5 minutes long.  Tomorrow Part Three will be all about the Case For Support.

Funder For Animal Welfare Charities

The Jean Sainsbury Animal Welfare Trust

There is usually a wonderful human interest story behind each trust and this one is no exception.  Jean Sainsbury led a wonderful life, filled, as many peoples lives are, with moments of tragedy and fulfillment.

When Jean's estranged Father died leaving her millions, she decided she would use the money for the good of others, especially the welfare of animals.

The Trust meet three times a year to discuss applications - March, July and November and consider requests from £1000 to £10,000.  They do sometimes also consider smaller applications outside of these dates but these are at the discretion of the Chairman and Administrator.  The deadline for applications received is: 1st February (for March meeting) 1st June (for July meeting) and 1st October (for November meeting).

Someone from the Trust will visit you if you are successful in your application, which I really like the idea of as it links your work with the people paying for it and it also means that any future applications have  deeper connection with the charity.  Another great thing about this organisation is that they are happy to receive repeat applications which so many other charities do not.

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Professional Fundraisers…who needs ’em?

There was an interesting article in this week's Third Sector magazine (6 July).  I shouldn't have received it at all... I cancelled my subscription sometime ago in an effort to be green...I read their news articles online usually, so was somewhat surprised (and shamefully delighted - please don't hold it against me!) to receive the magazine through the letter box.

In this article called The Future of Fundraising, Richard Gutch asks the question: "When do you stop being a government contractor and start being a charity?"

It's a good question isnt it!

Richard makes the point that many of our biggest charities in the UK, receive significant amounts of government funding and it is they that are facing extremely hard times as the cuts are made to public expenditure.

Back in May, Richard had interviewed CEO's in 9 charities asking them the same question.  He found that many of them had not had to do much fundraising at all, so awash were they in government money. In some cases income from fundraising was a little as 10% of overall funds.

"one described their charity as like a branch of the NHS..."

About 40,000 charities are today relying...RELYING...on government contracts to run their charities and deliver essential services to some of the most vulnerable people in the country.  That's 25% of our entire voluntary sector, with some of the largest charities in that 25%.  What this may mean we can only have nightmares about.
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How Do Donors Choose Charities

Dr. Beth Breeze is a researcher within the Centre for Charitable Giving and Philanthropy which is partly based at the University of Kent, where she also co-founded the Centre for Philanthropy, Humanitarianism and Social Justice.

In Dr. Beth's blog she has given some really great tips for finding the perfect donor.  As those of you who have subscribed and received my free eBook "How To Find Your Fundraising Focus" will know, I stress the importance of understanding your donor's motivations for giving.  This way you will know how to "market" your fundraising case in a way that attracts the people who are able to give.

In her article Dr. Beth writes: "I found that  most people tend to support organisations that promote their own preferences, help people they feel some affinity with and support causes that relate to their own life experiences."

With 5 other key findings Dr. Beth's blog is a very useful source of information for all fundraising professionals.

Beth does bring up a really important point up at the end.  One of my "orange box" moments is about how the Voluntary Sector is supporting the country by providing essential care and services to people most in need...care and services that have at one point been provided by the Government, through the NHS and other departments.  With the Government cuts looming across the board, the pressure may rise on the Voluntary Sector more than it can actually cope with.

I have two thoughts about this...firstly I think to myself..."should the Government really be responsible for everything I think they should?" and secondly: "what will happen to those most in need when the service and care they rely on is at best in a state of flux or worse...wiped out"

Maybe I should get out more?  What do you think?

To read the rest of Dr. Beth's article please go HERE.