Sponsorship – Running For Charity

A few weeks ago I joined a running club.  I know this doesn't sound very exciting, for me, it was.  I haven't done any exercise for years and the thought of exerting myself was quite off putting.  So when I actually turned up at the Arrow Valley Runners club I even amazed myself.  I've now been five times and have also started running during the week too.

The Arrow Valley Running Club is an excellent opportunity for runners of different backgrounds and fitness levels to run within a group and share training tips. 

Michelle Waldron decided to set the running group up in December 2009 for people who wanted to run in a non-competitive and friendly environment. 

The club is ideal for new and experienced runners who like being part of a group, want to learn more and improve their running skills and fitness.  The Club regularly train for races such as 5k, 10k and half marathons and race participation is entirely optional. The club meet in Redditch Worcestershire, at Arrow Valley lake in the Battens Drive Car Park every Saturday morning at 10 am.

What have I found out about myself?  Well, firstly, I was fitter than I thought I was I think because I do alot of walking, which I really enjoy.  Secondly, I love running!  Fascinating!

So when a friend forwarded on an email she had received from Cancer Research it gave me an idea for a blog and a way of raising money for this charity. 

I was a small child the last time I did anything sponsorship based and have never been involved in anything like that as a fundraising consultant (as it's not my specialism) so thought it was a good opportunity to achieve lots of firsts in one go and support a fantastic charity.

The race is a 10K.  The furthest I've managed so far (without stopping ) is about 2 miles...so times that by 3 and that's a 10K race.  I think I'll be able to do that?

The website is really good for hints and tips on how to get fit for the run.  There is a whole page devoted to a training plan and it also gives you help on how to get sponsorship.  They have even thought about involving people who can't or don't want to run - they can volunteer to help out on the day.

I like the website and layout, it makes it easy to get involved in some way small or large and I think that more charities could take advantage of this kind of event.

Sponsorship as a way of raising funds is a long standing method of supporting charities.  It makes people feel good to take part and it makes donating more personal.  As most people ask people they know to donate, it's very unlikely anyone would say no. 

I've given to charities via sponsor forms before, when people in an office I've shared hand them out, even though I haven't known them very well, because it would have been embarrassing not to have taken part when everyone else is...and a bit miserly too!  I respond better to this than I do to people holding tins out on the High Street...Chuggers as they are non-too friendly called.

 So I will keep you posted on how the running training goes and if you're interested yourself, here is the link:

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/10k/

Professional Fundraisers…who needs ’em?

There was an interesting article in this week's Third Sector magazine (6 July).  I shouldn't have received it at all... I cancelled my subscription sometime ago in an effort to be green...I read their news articles online usually, so was somewhat surprised (and shamefully delighted - please don't hold it against me!) to receive the magazine through the letter box.

In this article called The Future of Fundraising, Richard Gutch asks the question: "When do you stop being a government contractor and start being a charity?"

It's a good question isnt it!

Richard makes the point that many of our biggest charities in the UK, receive significant amounts of government funding and it is they that are facing extremely hard times as the cuts are made to public expenditure.

Back in May, Richard had interviewed CEO's in 9 charities asking them the same question.  He found that many of them had not had to do much fundraising at all, so awash were they in government money. In some cases income from fundraising was a little as 10% of overall funds.

"one described their charity as like a branch of the NHS..."

About 40,000 charities are today relying...RELYING...on government contracts to run their charities and deliver essential services to some of the most vulnerable people in the country.  That's 25% of our entire voluntary sector, with some of the largest charities in that 25%.  What this may mean we can only have nightmares about.
Read the rest of this entry

Fundraising for Churches

Church Fundraising

Churches can often be seen as one of the most difficult organisations to fund.  Most have costly and ancient buildings to upkeep, which are empty most of the week, whilst also having a declining tithing congregation.

So there are two needs here, which are frequently at logger heads with each other.  It really is a delicate balancing act, fraught with sensitivities that need careful handling.

There is also the contentious issue in lots of churches about ‘acceptable’ sources of funding, for example many will not accept or apply for Lottery Funding on religious grounds.

Depending on what you are raising funds for will depend on which method of fundraising you choose.  We know that many churches do event fundraising and do it very well, and they obviously do “database” funding from the Sunday morning collection.

Read the rest of this entry

8 Ways To Fundraise

8 Ways To Fundraise

Last time we talked about getting ready to Fundraise for your organisation.  I hope that it has prompted you to collate all the information you need and you are now ready to fundraise.

This post is about the many different ways organisations can raise funds because most need to use a range of activities to accomplish their aims and it’s here that we turn our attention to 8 Ways To Fundraise.

Trusts

There are currently just short of 160,000 charities in the UK (and another 20,000 subsidiaries) and a good proportion of those GIVE money away to other charities that are doing the kind of work they want to fund.  This is where your Case for Support is so important.  When you are writing a letter to a trust, your Case for Support will help you enormously.  With just a bit of tweaking the document will provide you with baseline information making each letter/application very straightforward.

High Net-Worth Individuals

Seeking out people who are very wealthy (High-Net Worth) with similar aims to that of your organisation, building relationships, and then asking for donations.

Read the rest of this entry